Memorable Classes: Script Analysis

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Peg was a strange bird and she taught a variety of somewhat-dry classes with all of the flair and drama that you would expect of someone with her stage acting credentials.

If the word pairing “Script Analysis” doesn’t conjure boredom for you, let me elaborate.  The class covered three units, three schools of thought on storytelling.

The first followed Aristotle’s Poetics, a breezy read that emphasized the importance of Plot (yes even above Character).  It was supposedly the first book about storytelling ever written, though being the loquacious type that he was, I’m sure Aristotle opted to go around talking about his ideas rather than shutting his trap long enough to jot them down himself so there was probably an unpaid intern that deserved a little bit of credit too.

The second unit delved into Lajos Egri’s Art of Dramatic Writing.  It was a dusty old book that you can buy for a nickel on Amazon.  Written in the mid 1940s, Egri’s book focused primarily on stage plays as his source work.  Regardless of the minor irrelevances for my film education that this bred, his notion of character-driven storytelling was revolutionary at the time and is still what we pretend to be aiming for with our screenplays and novels to this day.  Granted sometimes as writers we have to indulge a little bit and make the T-Rex inexplicably kill the Velociraptors.  Sure it’s Deus Ex Machina, but “Forget it Jake, it’s dinosaurs.”  <- Sorry, but we read the script for Chinatown in this class too.

The third unit was based on a blustery tome written by a pretentious windbag:  Story by Robert “Deuce Muffin” McKee.  That’s not his real middle name.  Well it might be, but I doubt it.  By the way, a “Deuce Muffin” is a muffin that is poop.  It’s probably not a real thing.  I might have made it up just now.

If you’ve seen the brilliant film, Adaptation, then you know Bob McKee as the man that killed that movie’s extremely engaging voiceover.  His work was very film-centric, and while it was good and useful, his tone was haughty and he liked to pretend that all of his rules and tips and guidelines were laws of physics that couldn’t possibly be defied by mere mortals such as you and me.

The spinal cord of the class was a series of criticisms that we had to write about a specific script that we chose at the beginning of the semester.  I chose 25th Hour, by David Benioff (currently of Game of Thrones fame, but this was long before that).  It had been produced and directed by Spike Lee, one of my favorites at the time.  The story chronicles the missteps of Monty Brogan as he wraps up his affairs in his final 24 hours of freedom before reporting to jail for an enormous drug sentence.  The script is powerful, the film beautiful, the performances stunning (Edward Norton playing Monty, Rosario Dawson as his wife, Philip Seymour Hoffman as his dweeby teacher pal and Barry Pepper as his brash stockbroker friend).  Let’s not get sidetracked here – unless you need to step away from the computer to go watch this movie.

This was one of three classes where I began to notice certain familiar faces and made friends accordingly.  Johnny (of Evil Beer fame) chose either Donnie Darko or Edward Scissorhands.  I don’t remember which, only that I was insanely jealous because those are two of my absolute favorite movies of all time ever.

Elle (of the doomed imploding friendship) chose My Own Private Idaho – a film so masturbatory that anyone other than Gus Van Sant claiming to have enjoyed it is either:  A.  A Liar  B.  Gus Van Sant in disguise.  I’m sure there is a great deal of meaning in the flick, but to this day my friends and I only mock a handful of scenes in this bizarre tale of male prostitutes starring River Phoenix and Keanu “I Know Kung Fu” Reeves.  The point is this:  Elle wasn’t very smart, so she should have picked something a little more straight forward like Ice Age 2 or something.

Forcibly trumping the relevance of all of our academic endeavors as they pertained to this class was Midnight Cowboy.  Now I know what you’re thinking, “Brantley, that guy has a name.  Surely his parents didn’t name him ‘Midnight Cowboy.’  That can’t possibly be on his birth certificate.”  And you may be right about that, but I’m telling the story and I haven’t given you enough information to produce documents to prove that this isn’t his name, or even that he was born in the United States as opposed to say, Kenya.

Well, Midnight Cowboy was writing his papers on, you guessed it, Midnight Cowboy.  (Trivia Aside – Midnight Cowboy is the only X-rated film ever to win Best Picture at the Academy Awards).  He sometimes had a little bit to contribute to the weekly class discussion, but most of the time he had everything to contribute to the weekly class discussion.  Don’t get me wrong.  He chose a rich film to write essays about, but I wasn’t being graded on his essays so listening to his oppressive hogging of one of my favorite professors got old.  Quick.

Anyways, I managed to squeak out an A in the class after rebounding from a C on my first for-real college paper.  Apparently Aristotle and I didn’t get along.

But the highlight of the class was Peg and her grand sense of characters and symbolism and metaphor and freaking everything in life.  Yes, even that model plane advertising the aviation museum where her husband worked.  It was grand too!  She was like Sally Bowles as played by Liza Minelli, only she didn’t provoke a bubbling rage within you every time she opened her mouth.

Years later I would watch Peg go HAM as Martha in Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf at the most microscopic black box theater in the world.  Seriously, this thing was like those Mighty Max and Polly Pocket play sets with the little figurines that you always lost immediately.

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6 thoughts on “Memorable Classes: Script Analysis

  1. underwaterraven

    Script analysis is something I’ve never done in my life (unless you count writing about certain scenes in a play for GCSE Theatre Studies…) To me it doesn’t sound all that interesting, but obviously I’m not passionate about the same thing as you. I’m very sorry to say that I haven’t seen any of the films you mentioned in this post except for Ice Age 2. I know people who live film get incredibly frustrated when people like me say they haven’t seen stuff, so don’t be mad! I just don’t watch films all that much (although one of my friends hasn’t seen LOTR, Star Trek or Star Wars…). Your lecturer (is that what you call them in America?) sound quirky and at least she’s passionate about what she teaches. There’s nothing worse than a boring or mundane teacher!

    • We call them “Professors” in America, but Peg just wanted to be called Peg ( though her full name, Margaret O’Keefe, was more befitting of someone with such a dramatic style of existence).

      I’ll try to keep my cool about you not being a movie person, but in return you have to watch one of the following films: Donnie Darko, Edward Scissorhands, or 25th Hour. (If you choose Donnie Darko, be sure to grab the Director’s cut. Whoever was in charge of the theatrical cut decided that the mythology that made the movie make sense wasn’t necessary.)

      As for your friend that hasn’t seen Star Wars, Star Trek, or LOTR, how often do they understand pop culture references? I feel like without at least a basic cinematic education, hearing people talk about anything can quickly turn into a confusing situation.

      You should make movies a bigger part of your life. They’re awesome. I always tell people, “A picture is worth a thousand words and films are shot at 24 frames per second, so watching movies is a way more productive use of your time than reading books!”

      • underwaterraven

        I have a habit of making a lot of film references in conversation and they’re mostly from either The Simpsons Movie, Mean Girls or Star Trek. I do LIKE movies, I just haven’t watched the “classics”. I mean, I haven’t even sat all the way through Titanic. And I haven’t seen Pocahontas. I just rarely have the patience to sit through an entire movie 😀

      • My parents quit buying them for my bruda for that very reason. So my Polly’s were guy friend-less.
        It took me awhile to lose some of them. Usually A month. One got ate by the couch in a week. And most got thrown in the bird cage by my bruda. That jerk =P

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